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Friday, January 2, 2015

Will Obama ever condemn Sharpton?

When Barack Obama was elected to be the 44th president of the United States, there were high hopes for what he could accomplish. A nation that had made its way past slavery, through a Civil War and beyond segregation was finally going to fully heal as Americans elected their first black president. Sadly, that promise and those dreams never came true. In fact, the opposite has happened. America’s race scars have been cut wide open, and the healing has been replaced with unnecessary and deceitful division. How? Obama’s decision to build a partnership with and lend credibility to one particular person is partially to blame.

MSNBC host, tax evader and proclaimed “Reverend” Al Sharpton is a top adviser to President Obama and has been since day one in the Oval Office. In fact, with more than 60 visits to the White House during Obama’s tenure, you could say Sharpton is one of the top advisers outside of paid staff. Heck, he’s even vacationed with the president on Martha’s Vineyard and has a close relationship with senior White House adviser Valerie Jarrett. He’s also played a key role in advising Obama about nominations to powerful positions inside the federal government, including a replacement for Attorney General Eric Holder as the nation’s top law enforcement officer.

It was just recently that President Obama spoke at Sharpton’s April 2014 National Action Network conference, where he praised and glorified him as a leader.

“I want to say, first of all, thank you to your leader, Reverend Al Sharpton. Give him a big round of applause,” Obama said, giving him even more legitimacy. Attorney General Eric Holder said similar things during a speech at the conference, going out of his way to repeatedly thank him for his friendship and longtime partnership. (Contines)

Thursday, December 18, 2014

This is not a good trade.

Candidate Barack Obama said that, as president, he would talk to anti-American dictators without precondition. He didn’t mention that he would also give them historic policy concessions without precondition.

His surprise unilateral change in the U.S. posture toward the Castro dictatorship came without even the pretense of serious promises by the Cubans to reform their kleptocratic, totalitarian rule.

The trade of Alan Gross, the American aid worker jailed in Cuba for the offense of trying to help Jewish Cubans get on the Internet, for three Cuban spies is understandable (we also got back one of our spies, and Cuba released several dozen political prisoners as a sweetener).

The rest of Obama’s sweeping revisions — diplomatic relations and the loosening of every economic sanction he can plausibly change on his own — are freely granted, no questions asked. It is quid with no pro quo. Even if you oppose the isolation of Cuba, this is not a good trade.

After waiting out 10 other U.S. presidents, the Castro regime finally hit the jackpot in Obama, whose beliefs about our Cuba policy probably don’t differ much from those of the average black-turtleneck-clad graduate student in Latin American studies.

Every dictator around the world must be waiting anxiously for a call or a postcard from Obama. The leader of the free world comes bearing gifts and understanding. He is willing to overlook human-rights abuses. And his idea of burnishing his legacy is to clinch deals with his country’s enemies.
(Continues at POLITICO)

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Candy Crowley "leaving" CNN

Candy Crowley, the veteran CNN political correspondent and host of CNN's State of the Union, will leave after 27 years with the network, CNN president Jeff Zucker announced in a memo to staff on Friday.

"[I]t is with mixed emotions, that I wanted to let you know that Candy has let us know that she has made the decision to move on, so she can embark on the next chapter of her already prolific career," Zucker wrote. "As difficult as it is for us to imagine CNN without Candy, we know that she comes to this decision thoughtfully, and she has our full support."

Zucker did not mention who would replace Crowley on State of the Union, the network's Sunday public affairs program. The network will be keeping the show, a spokesperson confirmed.* (Continues)