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Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Mosby’s Police family: Mom Failed Drug Test, father fired for robbing drug dealers, uncle fired after testing positive for cocaine.

The mother of Baltimore city state’s attorney Marilyn Mosby faced numerous disciplinary actions during her 20-year career as a Boston police officer, though the public wouldn’t know it based on the Freddie Gray case prosecutor’s public statements touting her family’s strong policing history.

The 35-year-old Mosby has used her family’s police ties to rebut critics who say she rushed to judgement and overcharged the six cops involved in Gray’s April 12 arrest. The 25-year-old Gray died a week later, touching off rioting in Baltimore and nationwide protests.

“Law enforcement is pretty much instilled within my being,” Mosby told MSNBC’s Chris Hayes on May 1, the day she publicly announced charges against the officers. “I come from five generations of police officers,” she added, pointing out that her mother, father, grandfather and uncles have all served as cops.

But there’s more to the story than Mosby has let on.

Personnel records obtained by The Daily Caller show that Mosby’s mother, Linda Thompson, first violated the Boston police department’s substance abuse policy in 2006. After serving a 45-day rehab stint, Thompson violated the drug code again and voluntarily resigned on Feb. 1, 2008, rather than be fired.

The early retirement allowed Thompson, now 52, to draw a $1,810.69 monthly pension.

Thompson is not the only member of Mosby’s family to have had a rocky policing career. Mosby’s father was fired from the Boston police department in 1991 following accusations that he and his partner robbed drug dealers at gun point. Mosby’s uncle was fired from Boston PD in 2001 after testing positive for cocaine. Her grandfather was a well-respected Boston cop, but he ultimately and unsuccessfully sued the department for racial discrimination in the 1980s.

Mosby’s public comments reminded one retired Boston detective of something her mom did in the 18th district police house on Oct. 3, 1995.

That was the day a California jury found O.J. Simpson not guilty of murdering his ex-wife, Nicole Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman.

The detective, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, told TheDC that when the bombshell decision was announced, an ecstatic Linda Thompson jumped up on the desk of another officer and began “doing a victory dance.”

The retired detective said he was bothered by the display but felt he couldn’t do anything about it. Thompson did not respond to a phone message and several emails sent over the past three weeks seeking comment about the incident.

Thompson’s former colleague gave other insight into her work in the 18th district, which encompasses Boston’s Hyde Park.

“This is a woman we carried because half of the time she was on drugs, she was high,” the former cop told TheDC in a phone interview.

“Everybody knew it, but nobody wanted to say anything,” he added. “She did nothing. All she did was put in the hours.”  (Full Story)

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